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20130814
20130814
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
thinks of the n.s.a. surveillance programs. america's newest millionaires tell us what they think of their good fortune. and a mother and child reunion is only a moment or two away. when the cbs evening news continues. continues. the most preferred and the most studied. so when it comes to getting the most out of your multivitamin, the choice is clear. centrum. the choice is clear. with freshly bakedeve in whole grain bread.right then we add all-natural eggs... lean antibiotic-free ham... and vermont white cheddar. get 16 grams of protein and 23 grams of whole grain in the breakfast power sandwich. i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not
you are on all of those nsa stuff. this is what's going to happen. all of our conspiracy theory friends are going to say i deliberately waited to do all of the stuff when jim wasn't here. and my story is that he's having a colonoscopy. not here to defend himself. no, we've been getting into -- what would you call it, chris, a spirited debate. >> yes. >> stephanie: about the nsa stuff and snowden, hero, traitor, blah, blah, blah. anyway, paul in houston writes steph, listening to jim ward talk about the nsa makes me want to pull my eyelashes out. this is the same guy who says the founders couldn't have imagined assault weapons when writing the second amendment. paul in houston. [ applause ] i just -- i just think -- and again, you can fill in for jim and say i'm an idiot. but it is a tough balance between security and privacy. you can't have 100%. i don't think of either. >> are there ways to give up less of your -- i don't want to say freedom but when you engage in facebook and twitter, you are engaging in perhaps an arena that might allow you to be spied on more so that you do
has changed position here. remember, when the guardian newspaper first. exposed the nsa was conducting millions more searches than it told congress, the president insisted there was nothing wrong with the program. first he said the nsa had already achieved the right balance. >> on balance, you know, we have established a process and a procedure that the american people should feel comfortable about. but when you actually look at the details, then i think we've struck the right balance. >> second, even though reports show the nsa was sketly ducking the rules, the president told us the court and its judges had it covered. >> we also have federal judges that we put in place who are not subject to political pressure. >> and third, president obama said the programs were sufficiently transparent, in fact, when asked if government should explain the new authorities which it had expanded without any public debate at the time, president obama said the court was transparent enough. >> should this be transparent in some way? >> it is transparent. that's why we set up the fisa court. >> so accordi
. she did at the bar association. she said there she is going to give a speech on the nsa debate right now. correct, which is really interesting, given that in 2008, the primary was lost in part because of the left's upset with her vote for the iraq war. the nsa is an issue liberals are very unhappy about and the base of her party is unhappy about. i am surprised that she is getting out there ahead of things as much as she is. >> and very forward looking. >> correct. >> she could easily go in and reminisce about being first lady or talk about her tenure as secretary of state. hey governor, i want to ask you the $64,000 question. here it is. how much are these movements across the country by the gop precipitated by census data pertaining to what's to come in this country in 2050 when whites become a minority as a group of the population? >> i think a lot of it's being driven by that. by the way, you're showing your age. no one under 35 knows what the $64,000 question was. but you're absolutely right. it's being driven by that, and it is truly despicable. i don't care where you are, and
know what the nsa is up to, we didn't fine out from the "washington post" or the "new york times." right? >> uh-huh. >> bill: so i don't blame him for not trusting the american media, and i think that it gets back to the question about -- and i have been in this debate with -- with many friends, well if he really thought was something was wrong with what nsa was doing, then he should not have blown the whistle, he just should have gone through the proper channels. yeah. now, imagine what reception snowden would have got if he had gone to the nsa leadership, or if he had gone to the cia or the white house. >> thank you very much, we appreciate your concern. here have a seat in the back of this unmarked car. >> bill: yeah. or imagine if he had gone to a lot of the main stream media. they wouldn't have touched it. so i got to tell you, when i see my colleagues in the media not doing their job -- and too often it is because -- just as he said they are afraid of being painted as anti-american as unpatriotic, or as anti-the current president of the united states, and so they just -- or
i concerns about this technology. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology bit.could be abused a i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are
straight-up lied to congress back in march about the nsa's collecting of data on americans. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no, sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. i was asked when are you going to stop beating your wife kind of question which is meaning not answerable, necessarily, by a simple yes or no. so i responded in what i thought was the most truthful or least untruthful manner by saying no. >> that's the guy who's in charge of setting up the independent outside group of experts the president said would be in charge of making sure government surveillance programs maintain the trust of the people and are not abused. initial reports indicated that clapper, himself, would pick the members of the group. clapper's office has since pushed back and said he's not actually choosing members. according to the white house's me memo, this independent group will be answering to clapper, briefing the president on their findings and recommendat
and return to the 1970s and 1980s. >> this is too successful. >> so you override the constitution? >> the nsa program. successful. >> it is not. it is very much different. there's probable cause. >> what is the probable cause? >> someone acting suspicious. >> one of the suspects was crawling out of a window of a dilapidated home. another was a wanted poster. he looked exactly like the one on wanted poster. these are the ones the judge said were constitutional. no, this judge is wrong on this, makes me want to leave new york. so ridiculous. >>> coming up, willie robertson makes a guest appearance on "the five." stick around. please. what's this? uhh, it's my geico insurance id card, sir. it's digital, uh, pretty cool right? maybe. you know why i pulled you over today? because i'm a pig driving a convertible? tail light's out.. fix it. digital insurance id cards. just a click away with the geico mobile app. anarchy meets order. working with at&t, doctors set up a broadband solution to handle data and a mobility app to stay connected with their business. so they can run the office... even when t
questions over edward snowden's revelation that nsa spying has expanded to all of latin america with brazil its biggest target. >> i have asked the people of on theto stay focused important realities of our the bilateral relations between our country which continue to grow stronger and stronger. brazil and other countries will understand exactly what we're doing, why and how, and we will work together to make sure that whatever is done is done in a way that respects our friends and our partners. and that is what we are going to achieve. >> brazil continues to demand an explanation from the white house on the spying. on tuesday, the foreign minister said the spying threatens to cast a shadow of distrust over u.s.-brazil relations. the oil giant bp has filed a lawsuit along the 2010 deepwater horizon oil spill. the environmental protection agency imposed the ban master, citing bp's lack of business integrity. in its lawsuit, bp says the ban amounts to abuse. those are some of the headlines. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. news in to breakin
and we work on a number of privacy issues. cell phone tracking, n.s.a. surveillance, we should have a right to communicate and send e-mails without worrying the government is keeping copies or copies of who we are talking to. we think that it is important to put in place privacy protections on drones and it is important to act on other technologies. i think that in this technological age there are ways we will lose our privacy. there are other ways in which we don't have to sit back, the technology is not in control, we are in control. for example, we have surveillance cameras all over the country, but almost none of them have microphones and that is not because they are difficult or expensive. it is because our wire tapping laws make it problematic to put microphones on cameras in public places. we put an expression of values in the law and it changed the way the technology was implemented. people who say you can't stop technology, there's nothing you can do, i think that is not a good way to think because we are in control of our values. if we do nothing, then i think that the pri
to tell you, i wrestle with it, nsa stuff bothers me, it is not in my opinion constitutional. this seems to be constitutional. >> 65 drop due to this. give you some facts. 4.4 million stops in new york city. 4.4 million, over 50% of the people in new york city. >> of a 10 or 12 year period. >> 1.5 per 4.4 million guns were found, that's it. everything else they didn't find anything. of those, 1 were black, 1.1 hispanic, 3% white. 4.4 million people, you came up with that little stuff and that was the reason you dropped crime 65%? get out of here. it is unconstitutional. show me one thing they did. >> chicago and philly don't have stop and frisk, chicago has a murder rate four times new york, and philly about triple. >> does that help you wrestle to the right conclusion? come on. >> if you wish to adopt chicago's tactics over new york city's, you're an accomplice to mass murder. >> if you believe this stops crime. 4.4 million, and 1%? >> they confiscated so many illegal weapons and don't put them back, it helps decrease arrests, crimes aren't committed. >> you know why, they're looking --
discussed it would have been buried. i believe he was in favor of what nsa was doing this operation -- >> you sayg he knew? >> i say i find it difficult to believe as an american citizen he did not a clue at extend of what they are doing, he is our coder in chief, he is in charge. iin my mind, how many committees e worth while? >> that is what i was thinking, commissions and their work pile up largely ignored. >> you are putting james clapper in charge of investigating james clapper, he is in charge of investigatng -- >> you find that odd? >> bizarre, and i watch that press conrence, it was a great defense of obamacare, but a horrible defense of this. because, you are right. no president wants toave another 9/11 on their watch. nobody. they will go to whatever measures they will go to to prevent it from happening, i think measures a way too extreme. i'm not comfortable them. i am opposed to it. it has gone wayyoverboard, so, my attitude is, don't have another commission, you know what you are doing, you don't need t to investigate it, clappr investigating clap ser really clper is re
that make the nsa surveillance program worth it? >> the thing is, i don't think there's been any evidence that anything intercepted from the program of spying or collecting american data has ever uniquely been used to stop any terrorism. you know, they had a discussion with senator leahy and the committee and they talked about 50 plots and then it got down to 15 and 4 and 1. >> how many had been explicitly stopped. >> i'm not against tapping phones of people you suspect to be terrorists. all i'm for is calling a judge first. i'm not for looking at all american's records, but if an american is involved, call a judge. it's not that hard to get a warrant. we fought a revolution over separating the powers, not letting police get warrants, you have to call a judge. >> what the united states did in response is close the embassies and there's been this unprecedented spate of drone attacks that happened in the last week, ten days. a lot of people have been killed and only a couple of terrorists. and you can read into that what you will what that might do to the united states. you've said before m
. >> he lives out of the country. >> news organizations. >> the nsa missed that they vacuum all of the e-mail communication outside of the country. they're getting him and anybody that communicates with him. it goes on a network effect from there. >> the implications both in terms of source and journalistic interaction, like the idea that you have to have encrypted communication is a new way of thinking about journalism, that you really -- i mean, the constant awareness that nothing you do or say online in any electronic format is safe -- >> right. >> -- changes the dynamic. >> not the potted plant out on the patio. >> no, it's not. >> it sounds crazy. it's a way to marginalize you and make you sound like a nut. >> speaking of marginalizing and sounding like a nut -- terrible segue. no, that's not what i meant. turning now to new jersey, chairman steele, cory booker is one step closer to heading to capitol hill after winning the primary. with 50% of the vote, he hand dilly won. after his victory booker addressed his supporters. >> it is such an honor to be your nominee, to be your democr
the difference between security and safety when talking about the nsa. but when you talk about the real lived experiences of young black and brown men in our major urban american cities, you somehow lose that sort of concept. it doesn't exist. we're talking about civil liberties for american citizens. the data matters. the fact that there's only 1.8% of the black and brown men that have been stopped and frisked who have turned up having or hiding any kind of weapon is telling data. you know, hundreds of thousands of these young men have been subject to their violation of civil liberties. that's why there needs to be oversight and we need to end it. >> karen, let me give you breaking news. the right keeps saying, well, the crime is in black and latino communities. that's why we go there. that's why they're the majority. but in the report that was considered on this case, in mostly white new york neighborhoods, blacks account for the majority of stop and frisk. >> right. >> in the 78th precinct, 70% of the residents are white. but 79% of the stops are black or latino. they're stopped at over 3/
. remember, google was named by the guardian newspaper as one of the companies that give the nsa direct access to its systems. google denied that but also think back google got in trouble for using the street view cars for gathering information in neighborhoods. google then agreed to pay a $25,000 fine to the feds and move on. >> brave new world. thank you. more on that. >>> all right. still ahead here. there are questions about what's an appropriate punishment after prosecutors asked a few months of probation for two of the teens who brutally beat this fellow classmate. this video is hard to watch. a 13-year-old kid under those bunch punches being landed on a school bus ride home and new controversy involving this woman. the irs boss collecting almost $15,000 a month after she refused to testify. she's a taxpayer paid employee in the role she had over targeting conservative groups. with diabetes, it's tough to keep life balanced. i don't always have time to eat like i should. that's why i like glucerna shakes. they have slowly digestible carbs to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ mal
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)